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    News — pantrytips

    Clever Ways to Reuse Your Wholesomeness Containers

     

    Did you know that our meal containers are recyclable and reusable? We know that recycling is great, but reusing is even better. Reusing is a great way to repurpose something that otherwise would have just been sent to the recycling bin…simply reusing an item can help reduce energy, prevent pollution, and reduce waste all at the same time.

    So, why not preserve the life of your Wholesomeness containers a little bit longer by finding some creative uses to reuse them around your house…we’ve put together a few different ideas below. We hope this list helps to inspire your own repurposing efforts at home!

    1. Start your own seeds

    Our meal containers could make great seed starting containers. Simply drill a few holes in the bottom for drainage, add some soil and some seedlings (e.g. tomatoes) and watch your mini garden grow.

    2. For the artist inside

    Use your Wholesomeness container lids as paint trays to blend colours, or use the containers to keep colours separate. Simply snap on the lid to keep the paint from drying out.

    3. Kids organisation

    If you have kids, you know that simple food containers are soo handy for keeping things organised, contained and out of arms reach. Use them to store the kiddies craft supplies, board game pieces, or electrical cords and chargers. Plus, they’re stackable, lightweight and portable, making organising a breeze.

    4. Ask your local kindergarten, primary school or arts centre

    If you are still in surplus, ask your local community if they need any donations. There are high chances that they do!

    5. Fridge organisation

    Use your Wholesomeness meal containers to hold and organise bits and bobs in your fridge, for example bunches of herbs, blocks of cheese, or small individually wrapped packaged snacks that you need a place to stash them. You could use them to help you plan food rotations, by labelling day 1 to 4. Stick labels on them and stack them up for that Instagram-worthy, organised fridge look! 

    There are lots of other ways to put our containers to good reuse around the house. We hope these clever repurposing ideas have inspired you, or maybe you have some other ideas we have forgotten about! Be sure to let us know 🙂

     

     

     

    Author:
    Lisa Cutforth
    B.Sc Nutrition with Psychology (Dual Degree)
    Consulting Clinical Nutritionist to The Banyans Wellness Retreat
    Owner and Managing Director of Wholesomeness and Wholesomeness-on-Roma

    Eating Seasonally: Spring

    It’s September, which means spring and we can certainly feel the change in climate in sunny Queensland already! After a couple of months of warm, cosy winter stews and soups we’re ready to dive into some of our favourite lighter dishes again.

    Spring means warmer weather, leaves on the trees, flowering plants, and the appearance of fresh, light spring veggies. Spring is all about detoxifying foods that are refreshing and regenerating. They’re light and fresh, like crisp asparagus (a classic spring veggie), beets and green leafy veggies.

    We know that certain fruits and vegetables flourish at certain times of the year, and it’s a good idea to buy seasonal produce however because grocery stores stock just about everything all year round, it’s sometimes easy to forget what’s in season and what’s not. 

    A good tip is to take a walk around your local farmer’s market and see what kinds of produce are available – these will usually be the ones that are in season.

    There are many benefits to eating seasonally.  The food is at its freshest, tastes the best, is best for you, is more sustainable, and is usually cheaper. It also allows us to get back to the roots of local and sustainable eating, by supporting local businesses and our local community as a whole.  

    Seasonal fruits and veggies that have been allowed to fully ripen on the plant and picked at the peak of freshness are better quality and higher in nutrition compared to produce that is picked unripe and then transported to different areas or countries.

    Foods that are harvested in your local area at a certain time are also dealing with the same environmental factors that you are. For example, summer fruits and veggies are often higher in water content (e.g. tomatoes or watermelons), which makes sense given that during summer we are often hot and sweaty and need more hydration from our diet.

    Tomatoes also contain an antioxidant called lycopene which research has shown to be helpful in protecting our skin against the sun’s rays…so it does make sense why tomatoes thrive in warmer weather. Eating local sustainable produce allows for maximum nutrition that is tailored to your local environment.

    Eating foods that are in season gives you the opportunity to appreciate the foods that are available, and allows for more variety in your diet as seasonal foods are constantly shifting – a wonderful cycle that allows you to experience each food.

    We’ve been cooking dishes that feature lots of Spring seasonal veggies the past few weeks, like our one-pot Greek Chicken with Zucchini and Potatoes, and our Roast Fennel with Chickpea Skordalia, Grilled Zucchini and Cherry Tomatoes. 

    What veggies are in season this spring? Print out our handy list of spring seasonal veggies and hang it on your fridge!

     

    Stock Your Pantry, Fridge and Freezer the Smart Way

    Did you know?
    According to Foodbank Australia, our country produces food for 75 million people, which is three times our population!

    We definitely do not advocate for panic-buying food and supplies right now (especially if you already have enough), as it starts to create a cycle of stocking, depletion and restocking in the supermarkets that is hard to break, as well as potentially leaving others in the community to miss out on important items that they may really need.

    It is normal to feel a little shaken and panicked in an uncertain time like this, especially since none of us might have ever experienced something like this in our lifetime.  

    In times of extreme uncertainty when fear and feelings of anxiousness may be high, filling the fridge and pantry up with foods and supplies may be the only thing that we feel we can control. It gives us a sense of order and organisation, in a time when we might feel unprepared without a plan. Despite this though, panic-buying and spending lots of money on things you may not need is probably not the best solution. Read on for our tips on stocking your pantry, fridge and freezer the smart way…

    • Remember that if you do want to buy a little extra, you only really need two week’s worth of food and supplies as that is how long you would be in quarantine for if you were exposed to COVID-19 (if you are choosing to self-isolate for longer or want to avoid lots of trips to the shops, then certain pantry staples that have a long shelf life will be your friend, read on for examples…).
    • Take this extra time at home as an opportunity to give your pantry a big clear out. Before you hit the shops, take a look inside your pantry and evaluate what you have and what you might need. You might just find some hidden gems at the very back that you had forgotten about!
    • A little extra supply of sturdy and reliable staples like dried beans, lentils and split peas, grains and frozen veggies can mean endless meal opportunities, with the use of different spices powders and mixes. If there are no frozen fruit or veggies left, you could buy some fresh ones and even freeze them yourself. Having a good supply of nutritious pantry goods that can be spread out for a variety of different meals will be more cost effective and will reduce the amount of shop visits you need to make.
    • A few extra packages of pasta, rice and canned goods like beans, chickpeas, coconut milk and diced tomatoes.
    • Fresh produce that have a longer shelf life –peppers, onions, garlic, carrots, celery, apples and citrus fruits all have quite a long shelf life and pack a lot of nutrition. Hardy root veggies like potatoes, turnips, beets and radishes can also keep for weeks in a cool, dark place in your pantry.
    • Fermented or pickled vegetables like sauerkraut and kimchi can add heaps of flavour and they immediately brighten up any dish, like a rice bowl or even just a sandwich. Dehydrated vegetables (especially dried shiitake mushrooms) to boost the immune system and add umami flavour to soups and broths. Freeze dried herbs for adding freshness, flavour and a pop of colour.
    • Last but not least, a stash of hearty Wholesomeness meals in your freezer for those days when you don’t have much on hand, you’re in quarantine and can’t make it to the shops, or you just don’t feel like cooking!

    Remember that if we all remain calm and mindful, purchase only what we need, try to help others and check on the elderly and vulnerable when we can, we can get through this together.