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    News — low fodmap

    What is the Low FODMAP Diet?

    A very widely discussed topic in the world of grumpy guts is the Low FODMAP diet…but what exactly is the Low FODMAP diet? Read on to find out more about this evidence-based dietary strategy…

    What are FODMAPs?

    FODMAPs are a group of short-chain carbohydrates and sugar alcohols found naturally in foods and additives. FODMAPs include fructose, fructans, galacto-oligosaccharides, lactose and polyols. They have been linked to a variety of digestive issues common with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) such as gas, bloating, diarrhoea, constipation, stomach pains and altered gut motility.

     The low FODMAP diet for IBS

    The International Foundation for Gastrointestinal Disorders has estimated that 10-15% of the world’s population suffers from IBS, with most people being under the age of 50. The condition can have a huge burden on quality of life, with symptoms being unpredictable, often causing unwanted disruptions to personal and professional activities.

    As such the low FODMAP diet was created to help control symptoms of IBS, and it can also be used if you have been diagnosed with FODMAP intolerance. 

    Working with a health professional, the low FODMAP dietary strategy usually involves a four phased response: clinical assessment, dietary assessment, education, followed by the reintroduction phase. The diet starts by restricting high FODMAP foods for 4-6 weeks, and ends by slowing re-introducing the high FODMAP foods. The end result is a diet that can be used long-term that is low in the individuals problematic FODMAPs.

    What can you eat on a low FODMAP diet?

    The types of foods that are restricted on a low FODMAP diet depends on the individual and that is why it is important to see a health professional to help you through the process.

    High FODMAP foods include:

    • Garlic
    • Onions
    • Wheat
    • Some fruits – apples, apricots, cherries, figs, mangoes, nectarines, peaches
    • Some vegetables – asparagus, cauliflower, leeks, mushrooms, snow peas
    • Legumes and pulses
    • Nuts: cashews, pistachios
    • Sweeteners
    • Other grains - amaranth, barley and rye
    • Some dairy products – cream cheese, cottage cheese, milk, yoghurt
    • Some beverages – chai tea, chamomile tea, coconut water, rum, desert wine

    Food composition knowledge is key to managing this diet, that’s why we created our low FODMAP meal plan to make it easier to eat low FODMAP (no more meal planning, ingredient research, or cooking!). Our low FODMAP dishes are gentle on the stomach and are cooked with maximum nutrition with the aim of healing and promoting gut health (improved gut health helps to ease digestive symptoms AND helps to support immunity – win win!)

    Some of our absolute favourite low FODMAP dishes include:

    • Roast Lamb with Zucchini, Tomatoes, Lemon & Herb Quinoa and Gravy
    • Roast Chicken with Mash Pumpkin, Green Beans and Savoury Jus
    • Orange Spiced Chicken with Coconut and Carrot Rice
    • Lentil Dahl with Lemon Spiced Rice, Green Beans & Tomato Chutney (also vegan!)

    Low FODMAP diet- what is it and who is it for?

    What are FODMAPs?

    FODMAP stands for Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides and Polyols, which are essentially a "family" of carbohydrates.

    They are found in a variety of different foods in differing amounts.  Foods high in FODMAPs include garlic, onions, kidney beans, mange tout, peas, apples, apricot, peaches, raisins, plums, avocado, wheat containing bread, cereal and pasta, barley, rye, spelt, cashews, pistachio, cow milk, goat milk, sheep milk, soy milk, yoghurt, cream cheese.  (This is not an exclusive list).

    Not all experts quote the same Low FODMAP lists so it can be confusing for some.  We typically refer to the Monash university as a resource for our list of low and high FODMAP ingredients. 

    Why do some people avoid them?

    Some people find it difficult to digest these types of carbohydrates, and eating foods containing these may lead them to experience symptoms like bloating, gas, constipation or diarrhea or essentially a group of symptoms often referred to as Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS). 

    People who suffer with IBS often find relief in avoiding some foods containing FODMAPs.

    How does it work?

    Usually people can tolerate low amounts of FODMAPs or can tolerate certain foods better than others.  It is usually not necessary to exclude all FODMAPs which is why it is called a Low FODMAP diet.

    For example, while beans are generally not tolerated, small to moderate amounts of canned, rinsed chickpeas are generally tolerated because the galacto oligosaccharides usually are leached into the water so the remaining chickpeas once rinsed are usually fairly low in them.

    Garlic infused olive oil is well tolerated but whole garlic is not.  The flavour and the oil is low in the FODMAPs as the carbohydrate is in the garlic itself.

    Wholesomeness is proud to be one of the first and only providers of Low FODMAP meals cooked, packaged and delivered to your door.

    Click Here to Start Your Meal Selection

    low fodmap sesame chicken with carrots and asian greens